Wills And Revocable Living Trusts

You're a young, married couple and just starting out in the world. You probably have small children and a large mortgage. Or, perhaps, you're a single parent, trying to make a life for yourself and your kids. Words like "assets," "estate planning" and "net worth" simply don't apply to you -- at least not yet. You don't have vast amounts of money in investments; you don't own lots of valuable property. If you died, there wouldn't be much to sort out financially, so, you certainly don't need a will. Or do you? The answer to that question is, yes, you do. A will, or even a living trust, encompasses many more factors than simply who inherits your money. There are several valid reasons why everyone, especially parents of young children, should have a legal will.

David Sayen, Your Turn: Contra Costa Times Coping with terminal illness can be difficult, both for patients and their loved ones. Medicare and hospice Hospice is a...

By Keith Maderer

While every parent wishes their family would remain civil and friendly after they pass, it is one of the most common problems after a death. Here are some ways to avoid the problems or settle them if they should arise. Use these four methods to help keep your loved ones working together, especially during the emotional and traumatic times that usually surround the death of a loved one.

7 Reasons Why You Need an Estate Plan, Daniela Lungu, Attorney at Law Will Alone Does Not Avoid Probate. When a client prepares a Will, they...